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rdouma  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, September 10, 2014 12:07:00 PM(UTC)
rdouma

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electric dryer is slow to dry. I checked continuity on heating element and high limit and thermostats and all are OK. heat selector switch seems to work and resistor in switch seems to be ok. The element seems to cycle the same amount of time whether on high or medium. Looks like the "regulator is incorporated into the timer switch. is this correct. Could it be bad or am I looking at another problem. BLower fan is fan and air ducting is free of obstructions.
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denman  
#2 Posted : Thursday, September 11, 2014 2:03:07 AM(UTC)
denman

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I cannot find a wiring diagram for this unit?
Do you have one?

[COLOR="Blue"]I checked continuity on heating element and high limit and thermostats and all are OK.[/COLOR]
Did you check for a grounded element?

[COLOR="Blue"]Looks like the "regulator is incorporated into the timer switch. is this correct. [/COLOR]
You lost me here.
What regulator are you referring to?
The heat regulation is done by the cycling/operating thermostat which is on the blower.
It has an internal heater which is turned on for low temperature settings. This adds heat to the thermostat which causes it to cycle more often resulting in lower heat output from the main heater element.
[COLOR="Blue"]
BLower fan is fan and air ducting is free of obstructions.[/COLOR]
To be absolutely sure it is not a vent problem try the following.
Unplug the unit and disconnect it from the vent system.
Now try a run.
If it now dries OK odds are the vent system needs checking/cleaning.
Be sure to check that the louvers on the outside of the house open correctly.

If you do not want any lint in the house.
Take a pair of pantyhose.
Put one leg into the other and then attach this to the dryer's vent.
Leave enough room so the pantyhose can balloon out like a windsock.

Both the above will let you check the temperature and the air flow.
rdouma  
#3 Posted : Thursday, September 11, 2014 8:23:33 AM(UTC)
rdouma

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Originally Posted by: denman Go to Quoted Post
I cannot find a wiring diagram for this unit?
Do you have one?

I checked continuity on heating element and high limit and thermostats and all are OK.
Did you check for a grounded element?

Looks like the "regulator is incorporated into the timer switch. is this correct.
You lost me here.
What regulator are you referring to?
The heat regulation is done by the cycling/operating thermostat which is on the blower.
It has an internal heater which is turned on for low temperature settings. This adds heat to the thermostat which causes it to cycle more often resulting in lower heat output from the main heater element.

BLower fan is fan and air ducting is free of obstructions.
To be absolutely sure it is not a vent problem try the following.
Unplug the unit and disconnect it from the vent system.
Now try a run.
If it now dries OK odds are the vent system needs checking/cleaning.
Be sure to check that the louvers on the outside of the house open correctly.

If you do not want any lint in the house.
Take a pair of pantyhose.
Put one leg into the other and then attach this to the dryer's vent.
Leave enough room so the pantyhose can balloon out like a windsock.

Both the above will let you check the temperature and the air flow.


I did find a wiring diagram in the switch wiring area. The dryer seems to work the same on medium and high. vent system is clear, I checked again. What regulates the cycling of the element on and off? I understand the thermostat turns the element on and off based on temp. and the heater in the therm. is used for low temp to "trick" the therm sensor into thinking the temp is higher than it really is to cycle more often to keep actual temps down. What regulates the on off time for medium and high? The element is not grounded. I have no continuity between the element and outer housing. Would replacing the operating/cycling thermostat cure the element cycle times on high? The element seems to cycle at the same rate on medium and high.
fairbank56  
#4 Posted : Thursday, September 11, 2014 9:13:01 AM(UTC)
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The operating thermostat cycles on/off and determines the exhaust temperature for all three settings. In high heat, voltage is removed from the thermostat heater. In low heat, full voltage is applied to the thermostat heater. In medium heat, the resistor on the back of the temp switch is placed in series with the thermostat heater which reduces the voltage to the thermostat heater.

Eric
rdouma  
#5 Posted : Thursday, September 11, 2014 1:39:00 PM(UTC)
rdouma

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Posts: 3

Originally Posted by: fairbank56 Go to Quoted Post
The operating thermostat cycles on/off and determines the exhaust temperature for all three settings. In high heat, voltage is removed from the thermostat heater. In low heat, full voltage is applied to the thermostat heater. In medium heat, the resistor on the back of the temp switch is placed in series with the thermostat heater which reduces the voltage to the thermostat heater.

Eric

So If I run the dryer with the back off and check the voltage with my Fluke at the therm. heater it should vary with the temp setting. IF it doesn't then the problem is the heater selector switch or the resistor. If voltage varies the thermostat needs to be replaced.- Don't worry i'll be carefull. I'm used to working around diesel generators.- Thanks
fairbank56  
#6 Posted : Thursday, September 11, 2014 2:06:24 PM(UTC)
fairbank56

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Well, your initial complaint is that the dryer takes too long to dry the clothes which indicates that it either isn't getting hot enough or there is an air flow problem. With temp set to high, there should be no power to the thermostat heater. You really need to check the exhaust air temperature with a thermometer at each temp setting to set a base to work from. You can just disconnect the violet wires from the timer to disable the thermostat heater. If the exhaust temp does not get high enough, then the problem can be due to a heater coil problem, faulty thermostat, air flow problem, low voltage due faulty timer or motor switch contacts...etc. Check for full 240vac across the heater terminals while in normal heat cycle. I know you said you would be careful but I must reiterate that, 240vac can kill you. It's far more dangerous than messing around with 120vac.

Eric
mrdance123  
#7 Posted : Thursday, September 11, 2014 3:22:50 PM(UTC)
mrdance123

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Posts: 7

The heating element might be 1/2 burned out. Some 240v heating elements are grounded in the middle, and either half can burn out, while the other half continues partial heating. This setup is effectively two 120v heaters working side by side. There are three wires going to this type of heater. Check continuity between the middle ground wire, and each of the two hot wires.
fairbank56  
#8 Posted : Thursday, September 11, 2014 3:39:17 PM(UTC)
fairbank56

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Originally Posted by: mrdance123 Go to Quoted Post
Some 240v heating elements are grounded in the middle, and either half can burn out, while the other half continues partial heating. This setup is effectively two 120v heaters working side by side. There are three wires going to this type of heater.



I don't know of any dryer that has that arrangement. Can you give me an example of one? Ground is never intentionally used as a current carrying conductor in a dryers AC circuitry.

Eric
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