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EastCobbSnob  
#1 Posted : Friday, November 13, 2009 3:55:00 PM(UTC)
EastCobbSnob

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Joined: 11/13/2009(UTC)
Posts: 3

I came home 2 nights ago to smell something burning from my laundry room. When I got there, smoke was coming from behind the dryer. I disconnected the fuse from the electrical panel and unplugged the dryer. (See attached photo).

First, I assume the problem is on the dryer side?
If so, I'm not sure what might have caused it (heating element?). I pulled the heating element out and took a picture.

The dryer is 10 years old.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

Steven
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denman  
#2 Posted : Saturday, November 14, 2009 2:04:34 AM(UTC)
denman

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Senior Expert
Joined: 2/29/2008(UTC)
Posts: 19,638

Here are your parts
Replacement parts for WHIRLPOOL LER5636EQ3 | AppliancePartsPros.com

Here is a wiring diagram
http://www.servicematters.com/d...0Sheet%20-%203406688.pdf

Check your heating element with meter.
The element should be around 10 ohms. Then check from each side to the case both should be Infinite ohms (open)

You will of coarse have to replace the line cord.
When you do, check that the wires at the units terminal strip are all OK.
Also check that the ground strap from the Neutral to the machine's frame is connected and looks OK.

You will also have to replace the receptacle in the wall.
Note, that is very important that the house wiring is cut back till you get to nice clean copper wiring with no overheating of the wire insulation.

I would also replace the circuit breaker in the panel just to be sure that it is OK as it may not have tripped when it should have. Also check the wiring in the panel.

After the wall receptacle is rewired check it with a meter to ensure you are getting the correct power.
L1 to L2 should be 240 volts.
L1 to Neutral and L2 to Neutral, both should be 120 volts.

A possible cause of this is a bad/poor connection of the plug to receptacle or of the wire to the plug's prong inside the line cord. This would create a resistance at this point. As current flows through this connection it creates heat which makes the connection worse, which creates more heat and so on and so on till the connection fails. Once the plastic gets not enough to turn black it turns to carbon and now you have a very serious condition.
I must say you were very lucky as it could have cost you your house.
EastCobbSnob  
#3 Posted : Sunday, November 15, 2009 11:38:24 AM(UTC)
EastCobbSnob

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Joined: 11/13/2009(UTC)
Posts: 3

Check your heating element with meter.
The element should be around 10 ohms. Then check from each side to the case both should be Infinite ohms (open)
Looks like I will need help with this one. I attached photos of some measurements I took with my multimeter. I'm not getting anything on the heating element thermostat (I tried every combination of connections), but I'm getting a reading from the other one.

You will of coarse have to replace the line cord.
When you do, check that the wires at the units terminal strip are all OK.
Also check that the ground strap from the Neutral to the machine's frame is connected and looks OK.

I replaced the cord. Everything around there looks good.

You will also have to replace the receptacle in the wall.
Note, that is very important that the house wiring is cut back till you get to nice clean copper wiring with no overheating of the wire insulation.

I stripped the wires back to some clean copper and replaced the receptacle.

I would also replace the circuit breaker in the panel just to be sure that it is OK as it may not have tripped when it should have. Also check the wiring in the panel.

will work on this one next weekend.


After the wall receptacle is rewired check it with a meter to ensure you are getting the correct power.
L1 to L2 should be 240 volts.
L1 to Neutral and L2 to Neutral, both should be 120 volts.

I got these readings from my multimeter.

A possible cause of this is a bad/poor connection of the plug to receptacle or of the wire to the plug's prong inside the line cord. This would create a resistance at this point. As current flows through this connection it creates heat which makes the connection worse, which creates more heat and so on and so on till the connection fails. Once the plastic gets not enough to turn black it turns to carbon and now you have a very serious condition.
I must say you were very lucky as it could have cost you your house.

This "possible cause" probably is correct. the receptacle wasn't properly attached to the wall, so part of it would hang loosely from the wall. I corrected that with the new receptacle.
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denman  
#4 Posted : Monday, November 16, 2009 3:53:43 AM(UTC)
denman

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Senior Expert
Joined: 2/29/2008(UTC)
Posts: 19,638

On your meter readings. Note: I am a tad rusty as I have not used an analogue meter in about 30 years.

First picture.
Remove the red wires. Then check across heater Red to orange. Should be around 10 ohms. If I remember correctly a reading of 1 will be 1,000 ohms so it will probably look like a dead short just because of your meter scale/sensitivity.
But that is OK.
Next measure from the red to the case, should be infinite ohms (open), meter dial stays to the left.
Then do the same from the orange to the frame, also should be an open.
This is testing to see if you have a grounded element.

Then check across the thermostat, should be 0 ohms. Meter all the way right.
If the above are OK reconnect the wires and you should be good to go.

Third picture:
This thermostat has an internal heater that is why it has 4 wires.
Contacts - red to red Should be 0 ohms
Internal heater - violet to violet Should be about 7,000 ohms. 7 on your meter.

One thing I notice is the way you are measuring. It is always a good idea to remove at least one wire from any device you are measuring for resistance. This prevents you from reading an alternate/parallel circuit path.

Hope the above helps.
EastCobbSnob  
#5 Posted : Tuesday, November 17, 2009 5:45:35 PM(UTC)
EastCobbSnob

Rank: Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/13/2009(UTC)
Posts: 3

Went through all the steps. everything checked out. Plugged everything back in and it works!

Can't thank den man enough for all your help.

Steven
Misspiggles  
#6 Posted : Monday, December 9, 2013 5:43:46 PM(UTC)
Misspiggles

Rank: Member

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Joined: 12/9/2013(UTC)
Posts: 1

Lucky you caught it mine set my clothes and house on fire...
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