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richappy  
#1 Posted : Monday, November 17, 2008 6:01:47 AM(UTC)
richappy

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Joined: 9/10/2007(UTC)
Posts: 9,586

Here is a test to determine bad bearings when there is no bearing noise.
Test the washer current either at the power line going into the control module, or the black input wire to the speed control board. Do not take current measurements near the motor as they could be in error from stray magnetic fields.
The current during wash period or high speed spin with an empty tub, should be 1 to 2 amps.
If over 3 amps, the bearings are starting to go bad.
This test is based on empirical measurements and assumes the same tub and spin basket assembly for these models.
For the MAH2000 through MAH4000 with the original 2.5 amp motor and speed control, 3 amps is a burn out level for the motor and speed control and continued operation will result in failure of one or both items.The motor thermal cutout may not protect these items due to the slow degradation of the bearings.Also, this current is RMS, not peak. Certainly the speed control board can get damaged from power line surges, thus a power line surge protector is advised for all these models.
Hope this test proves to be accurate, if not, please advise.
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magician59  
#2 Posted : Monday, November 17, 2008 8:46:53 AM(UTC)
magician59

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Joined: 8/16/2007(UTC)
Posts: 3,273

I normally do motor current tests in the console using a motor control wire in the harness somewhere after the board. Any danger of stray fields there?
richappy  
#3 Posted : Monday, November 17, 2008 10:56:30 AM(UTC)
richappy

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Senior Expert
Joined: 9/10/2007(UTC)
Posts: 9,586

No, I wouldn't expect any there. The test for stray fields near an electromagnetic device is to rotate the amprobe, if the reading changes, you are picking up a stray field.
magician59  
#4 Posted : Monday, November 17, 2008 12:05:11 PM(UTC)
magician59

Rank: Advanced Member

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Joined: 8/16/2007(UTC)
Posts: 3,273

Aha! Another wrinkle added to the old gray matter. Thanks.
christineAZ  
#5 Posted : Sunday, January 9, 2011 4:47:43 PM(UTC)
christineAZ

Rank: Member

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1

Hi,

I just found this thread looking for starting amps for a Maytag washer. We're off the grid and recently got a new (used and free) Maytag washer that we know worked well.

We replaced the old washer and it seemed to be washing just fine. Then we got back in the room and there was definitely a burnt smell -- unfortunately the generator hadn't been running and the batteries power was extremely low.

We have a 3000 watt (6000) inverter and we also tried to start the washer again by plugging it directly into our 3000/3500 watt generators.

It would not spin and would not drain. We finally took the laundry out and mostly emptied the water best we could. Thought we'd try it one more time and at least try to empty it, but the only thing we can achieve is have it fill with water again. As soon as it tries to start washing, the inverter trips or the generator chokes.

Been off the grid since 2007 and this is the first time we're having a serious problem. It looks like such a nice washer, any recommendations on repairs or what could be going wrong?

It DID wash fine the first time we used it, but then got stuck on the spin cycle until we got the burnt smell. Now we can't even get it to wash.

Appreciate any help with this,

Christine
richappy  
#6 Posted : Monday, January 10, 2011 3:24:05 AM(UTC)
richappy

Rank: Advanced Member

Groups: Senior Expert
Joined: 9/10/2007(UTC)
Posts: 9,586

Seems like your motor was drawing well over 3 amps. In operation with limited power from your generator you may have now burned out the speed control board/and, or motor as it will now not even agitate. High hp motors generally will smoke, draw high current, and burn out under heavy load and low line voltage. In these conditions, unfortunately, the motor internal thermal cutout will not protect the motor.
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